County of San Diego Joins Fight Against Sanctuary City Laws

It’s no secret the State of California is tearing at its political seams, careening towards a tipping point with the Sanctuary City battle leading the way.

TWO of the states THREE largest counties, both in Southern California, have now voted to oppose SB-54, the bill that limits law enforcement cooperation with federal immigration authorities.

San Diego and Orange counties represent more than 6 million people. Los Angeles County, which hasn’t weighed in on the subject, represents some 9 million.

The board of supervisors representing San Diego and Orange County have made it crystal clear they do not agree with Sacramento politics and are concerned with the “public safety shortcomings” SB-54 could bring.

By a vote of 3-1, the San Diego County Board of Supervisors supported the Trump administrations lawsuit that states SB-54 is unconstitutional. Supervisors Kristin Gaspar, Dianne Jacob and Bill Horn led the effort with yes votes, Supervisor Greg Cox voted no, Supervisor Ron Roberts was not in attendance as he was traveling out of the country.

Gaspar and Jacob issued the f0llowing statement:

 

The deadline to join the federal lawsuit has passed, but Supervisor Gaspar said the issue will most likely go to appeal and at that time, the county will file their amicus brief produced by County Counsel. Supervisors said this was not a symbolic gesture:

 

Some Spoke In Favor of SB-54

Several speakers turned out to speak for and against their particular political point of view.

Margaret Lindner of Carlsbad said she served in the military and was very concerned with the issue at-hand, “I’m terrified that this group of supervisors might join the Trump lawsuit. I just moved here from the very gerrymandered state of Pennsylvania and wanted to get away from political . I served our country and I’m concerned we’re going back to the Cold War. I implore you to not shame yourself with a for vote.”

Some Spoke Out Against The State

Veteran Jose Velasquez had pointed comments for SB-54 supporters, “I’m with Trump. These laws that are in place are endangering us. When did the state decide that illegals have more rights than citizens. You start working with ICE, you start working with law enforcement, I’m sick and tired of hearing I’m a racist for standing up for the constitution.”

Brown Blames “Low-Life Politicians” For Mess

Responding to the “mess” in the his state, reports that Gov. Jerry Brown at the National Press Club in Washington D.C. on tuesday said the immigration debate “has become” an inflammatory football and said “low-life” politicians are to blame for turning this into a political snowball.

Supervisor Dianne Jacob took issue with Jerry Brown’s comments and said, “I think there’s a message here, and the message is this, that those who are representing us in Sacramento do not represent the people.”

Los Alamitos Ramps Up Attack on SB-54

With the San Diego County Board vote and the Los Alamitos City Council vote Monday, 14 cities and counties in California have now voiced support for the Trump administrations lawsuit and effort to repeal SB-54.

The Los Alamitos vote was unique in that it was the only city that passed an ordinance. Los Alamitos declared itself legally exempt, saying the federal government — not the state — has authority over immigration. The other jurisdictions have passed anti-sanctuary resolutions or voted to join the lawsuit.

Signed Into Law October 2017

On October 5, 2017, Gov. Jerry Brown signed SB-54 into law. It was authored by Democratic Sen. Kevin De León who is running against Democratic Sen. Dianne Feinstein. De León said of SB-54, “California’s local law enforcement cannot be commandeered and used by the Trump Administration to tear families apart, undermine our safety, and wreak havoc on our economy. The California Values Act will limit immigration enforcement actions at public schools, hospitals and courthouses where all California residents should feel safe, regardless of immigration status.”

SB-54 is now part of a lawsuit brought by Attorney General Jeff Sessions and the Trump administration calling the bill unconstitutional.