NYC Mayoral Election Will Likely Be Decided on September 10 Primary

NYC mayoral election primary
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When New Yorkers return from their Labor Day excursions next week,  they will endure one last sprint of heavy campaigning from the host of mayoral candidates who are vying to top the Republican and Democrat tickets in the November elections.

With primaries set for September 10, 2013, each candidate will attend last minute fundraisers, community forums, and neighborhood meet-and-greets.

Despite the rush of activity from the candidates, New Yorkers appear less than poised to participate in the primary campaign. In 2009, the Democratic primary turnout was the lowest in modern New York City history with only 11 percent of enrolled casting their ballots.

This low turnout rate is particularly alarming because it means the 2013 election will most likely be decided on September 10 (or perhaps in a runoff on October 1 if no candidate receives 40 percent of the vote). The Democrat who wins the primary is expected to be the next mayor. Registered Democrats outnumber registered Republicans by almost seven to one in the city.

Rudy Guiliani and Bloomberg were exceptions with each running on particular issues: crime and the economy, respectively. With no Republican matching the same stature or issue specificity this year, the Democratic primary holds specific significance within a crowded field of contenders.

"For the first time in 24 years, New York City will not have a general election"Ken Auletta
As New Yorker writer Ken Auletta explains, Bloomberg’s successor will be chosen by only the 500,000 to 700,000 voters who pick the winner of the Democratic primary — which equates to roughly ten percent of the city’s five million voters.

“For the first time in twenty-four years, New York City will not have a general election,” Auletta reports.

New York City is the biggest city in the United States and its laws govern not only a large population, but have an outsized influence of the important financial sector and business community.

The abysmal voter turnout and antiquated election laws that only allow registered party members to vote highlights the dangers of the electoral system in the city that this year, maybe more than any in recent history, begs for reform.

The Independent Voter Network is dedicated to providing political analysis, unfiltered news, and rational commentary in an effort to elevate the level of our public discourse.


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21 comments
Diane Virga
Diane Virga

And I thought voting was a RIGHT!! Oh what a feeling to be denied yesterday, I feel so special....

Linda Dalton
Linda Dalton

well, they got Bloomberg in, so they get what they vote for - change the election law

Isaac Chorro
Isaac Chorro

that means weinner,will be the next mayor,Unbeliveable.

Ulfr Dokkr
Ulfr Dokkr

Life isn't fair. If you want to change things, take action. I don't see why we have primaries at all. Often times even if you are a party supporter, you end up voting forcsomeone you didn't want enough to vote for the fisrt time.

Peggy Shannon Crawford
Peggy Shannon Crawford

Indiana Primaries, you can ask for a Republican or Democrat ballot regardless of past voting record. To me that is the purpose of a primary--Choice. This gives Independents the choice.

Walt Connolly
Walt Connolly

Sounds like Wiener knows something we don't. He is at the bottom of the list and still holding on?? "we already k now he drank the cool aid and thinks he can do what he wants, like the rest of them. just saynnnnn

Skny John
Skny John

If republicans are so shut out of NYC electoral politics, then independents' chances are that much better not only to make NYC general elections matter, but to even get elected, despite the democrat's money, because democrat cheerleaders have even less of a valid argument that voting independent results in republicans getting elected.

Mickael Malove
Mickael Malove

It's fine. The calm before the storm. Independents don't need to be voting in a democrat primary election. If they at all believe in fairness to third parties, they shouldn't be supporting any candidate affiliated with the two controlling parties that refuse access to third party candidates to elections, debates, etc. Stop supporting the problem.

Brian Iniguez
Brian Iniguez

I wonder what the Get Out the Vote campaign in NYC consisted of.. pamphlets?

highammichael
highammichael

Not to mention that NYC has a closed primary system and 826,000 non-affiliated voters, more than registered Republicans.

There's an overwhelming majority of registered Dems in NYC, but if that candidate is likely to win, I think that anyone with any affiliation should have a say in the primary process.

Shawn M Griffiths
Shawn M Griffiths

It's an ongoing problem when only 10 percent of a population picks an elected official for an entire city, county, electoral district, or state office.