Security Measures Increase Flow of School to Prison Pipeline

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school to prison pipeline and safety
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Students who follow rules can still feel the tension of police officers patrolling the school halls. Tension depends upon the role of the campus officer, however.

Recent increases in school police could have detrimental impacts on student development. What’s known as the school-to-prison pipeline results from ineffective disciplinary practices. Share the news:

The school-to-prison pipeline is shown to disproportionately affect minority students. Officers on campus who enforce rules such as student ID, dress code, and student conduct sometimes have the discretion on disciplinary measures. Punishments can be punitive in nature and instead exacerbate, not change, misbehavior.

There have been cases where punishment for misconduct unnecessarily placed students in the criminal justice system. In 2011, 10,200 Los Angeles students were given tickets for misconduct that arguably could have been left to school officials to handle.

The issue of school safety hasn’t left the public dialogue since December’s Sandy Hook tragedy. Many local and state governments began taking action to increase police presence at schools.

According to the Center for Public Integrity, two Mississippi bills have been backed by National Rifle Association representatives. One bill would give the state $7.5 million for school security to grant to local schools. Matching funds of $10,000 would be required. Tweet it:

The Mississippi House passed another bill allowing designated school employees to carry concealed firearms. The bill is up for debate in the State Senate.

Indiana is considering a measure to offer $10 million in grants for school police. Alabama could create a lottery to provide $20 million for law enforcement in all its schools.

Education Week quoted Executive Director Maurice Canady of the National Association of School Resource Officers (NASRO), highlighting the dynamic of on-campus officers:

“You have to know this officer that you’re placing into this school environment. The wrong person in there—they can really do a lot of damage, reflect poorly on your department, and cause the whole community to say, ‘We don’t want law enforcement in schools.’” Tweet quote:

NASRO is in favor of placing more officers on campuses, but is opposed to arming school employees.

San Diego Unified Schools’ Police Services was contacted for comment. The department stated that its numbers and approach have not changed in reaction to the Sandy Hook tragedy. It continues to operate with training specifically for schools.

Last week, IVN contributor Chad Phillips proposed three ways schools can improve security without creating a tense environment.

An increase in law enforcement presence might be the solution to school security in the eyes of some lawmakers. However, all stakeholders must be mindful of how the presence affects student development. It may not be the best course of action if officers are placed to enforce school rules.

The issue isn’t as simple as more or less campus police. An on-campus officer’s role is important. If a school is seeking to increase its campus police services, creating a supporting member of the school should be a priority. In the case of an emergency, however, campus officers would be ready to act.

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  1. David Defriece Support
  2. James Goddard Yah , and liberals cause global warming every time they try to pass this kind of gas ! absolutely stupid !
  3. Wally Kohler But not me... Robynne. Nor was I for a war for profit and conquest, but I was a very small minority. And as for Democrats using it, what did the GOP think would happen? And if they or anyone else now think it is such a threat to personal liberty, has no one brought up it's repeal? Personally I believe it is and should be.
  4. Robynne Merguerdijian @Wally, president Bushmaster signed it, the 107th Congress of the U.S. drafted and a vast majority was for it...http://clerk.house.gov/evs/2001/roll398.xml
  5. Amir Will Khalili Every school I've ever attended had at least one on duty police officer on campus at all times. Didn't stop the two student riots we had but no man just walked in without being escorted out.
  6. Paul Grubbs "May create the school to prison pipeline" ? Lack of discipline and lack of law enforcement "may" lead to innocent students being shot to death at their desks too! Rural schools in Texas armed some qualified teachers and administrators years ago. So far nothing like Sandy Hook has happened. Keep y'all posted now ya hear!
  7. Steve Cox I wrote a column about this.http://thoughtcatalog.com/2013/the-bitter-pill-of-gun-control/
  8. Wally Kohler Robynne, could you refresh my memory on who signed the patriot act? Who created the nationalistic sounding Homeland Security? (couldn't use motherland or fatherland because they had already been used by other countries). Maybe TSA should be expanded to protect schools, after all they make you feel safe, right?
  9. Jason Bohringer Who's paying for this, the taxpayer or the NRA? Sounds to me like just another lobby group looking for taxpayer dollars. We already incarcerate more people than any other country! You can't cry cry about too much govt. on one hand then ask for more govt. control with the other.
  10. Jason Bohringer I agree with much of what you say but the article only mentions one political faction, the NRA. Last time I checked the NRA endorses Republicans not Democrats.
21 comments
James Goddard
James Goddard

Yah , and liberals cause global warming every time they try to pass this kind of gas ! absolutely stupid !

Wally Kohler
Wally Kohler

But not me... Robynne. Nor was I for a war for profit and conquest, but I was a very small minority. And as for Democrats using it, what did the GOP think would happen? And if they or anyone else now think it is such a threat to personal liberty, has no one brought up it's repeal? Personally I believe it is and should be.

Amir Will Khalili
Amir Will Khalili

Every school I've ever attended had at least one on duty police officer on campus at all times. Didn't stop the two student riots we had but no man just walked in without being escorted out.

Paul Grubbs
Paul Grubbs

"May create the school to prison pipeline" ? Lack of discipline and lack of law enforcement "may" lead to innocent students being shot to death at their desks too! Rural schools in Texas armed some qualified teachers and administrators years ago. So far nothing like Sandy Hook has happened. Keep y'all posted now ya hear!

Wally Kohler
Wally Kohler

Robynne, could you refresh my memory on who signed the patriot act? Who created the nationalistic sounding Homeland Security? (couldn't use motherland or fatherland because they had already been used by other countries). Maybe TSA should be expanded to protect schools, after all they make you feel safe, right?

Jason Bohringer
Jason Bohringer

Who's paying for this, the taxpayer or the NRA? Sounds to me like just another lobby group looking for taxpayer dollars. We already incarcerate more people than any other country! You can't cry cry about too much govt. on one hand then ask for more govt. control with the other.

Jason Bohringer
Jason Bohringer

I agree with much of what you say but the article only mentions one political faction, the NRA. Last time I checked the NRA endorses Republicans not Democrats.

Robynne Merguerdijian
Robynne Merguerdijian

There you see,

Opportunities like 'the need for "greater" security measures' become

Grounds for brave/new jobs charities were pudgy folks find their own job security, securing the insufficiently regulated childhood of this generation which will get the bill as soon those kids are ready to join a jobs charity of their choosing (if that will exist still I can't say).

Democranks took the patriot act and put it on steroids/predator drones.

Matthew Porter
Matthew Porter

Seriously? School-to-prison pipeline? What a bunch of nonsense. I graduated from a regular, middle-class public high school where we had a campus police officer. He was in no way there to act as a disciplinarian - that would be the principal's job. I never went to jail.

Mary Ann Wilson Putman
Mary Ann Wilson Putman

My school district has had a cop in the schools for years. It must be working, we've never had an incident.

Victor Friskey
Victor Friskey

I oppose it....Consider putting one or two more lives in danger, the cost of hiring guards, insurance, and etc...If they would install ADT type systems on the doors so at any particular time no one could get in without a code it would save thousands of dollars compared to armed guards and the children wouldn't feel intimidated either...besides that who is going to protect the children from a sniper when they are outside the building...

Wally Kohler
Wally Kohler

Maybe we should put cops in other places... Like people's places of employment and homes. They could then both protect and enforce laws proactively. It would seem to me that increasing police (i.e. government) presence in schools would bother our more conservative friends rather than give them comfort. As a person with more than 36 yrs in emergency services, I can assure you that a sense of safety is purely self delusional.

Greg DeLapp
Greg DeLapp

I support it. It seems the only ones that would be against it would be the.....criminal....types who are going to end up in jail anyway. I mean who wouldn't want to be safer? Police aren't there to be disciplinarians, they should be there to observe and protect. The schools own programs and rules should still guide the students.

Edward Bonnette
Edward Bonnette

It seems kind of crazy to me that many states are cutting funding to actual education but many of the above are quick to put up millions for 'protection'. Sandy Hook was horrible but I don't think the answer is more guns and police on campus.

Lucas Eaves
Lucas Eaves

I can understand why putting a policeman in a school to protect the student is an option agreed with by many, but I do not believe that these policemen should have any role in enforcing school rules. Teachers and school administrators have been trained to work with kids. Not necessarily policemen.

Michael Higham
Michael Higham

Here in San Diego, there's specific training for on-campus police officers. They're integrated into the school community and almost acts as a counselor as well. I think this is the right approach to putting an officer on campus, but cities across the US have placed officers in schools in reaction to Sandy Hook without much school environment training.

Alex Gauthier
Alex Gauthier

great point Lucas, not to mention how their obligations are complicated. Sometimes a peace officer isnt the right authority figure to deal with a problem in school