The Importance of the Latino Vote in the Upcoming Election

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Credit: fairimigration.org

There are currently over 50 million Hispanic persons in the United States according to the U.S. Census Bureau. This means that 1 out of every 6 Americans is Hispanic. The growth in Hispanics alone accounted for more than half of the overall population increase of 27.3 million people in the United States since the year 2000, making it the fastest growing demographic in the country. Furthermore the Hispanic population is projected to grow to over 100 million by 2050.

These figures point to the fact that the issues important to Latino voters will be a major focus this election season. Indeed, recent political rhetoric is already reflecting this. President Obama and likely GOP nominee, Mitt Romney, are pushing for the Latino vote and giving the spotlight to one of the main issues important to them: immigration reform.

According to CBS news,

“Romney said in a private meeting with supporters over the weekend that Republicans need to cater to Latinos more with policies like a GOP-version of the Dream Act.”

Latino voters have traditionally given their support to Democrats. In a hypothetical race, conducted last year by the Pew Research Center, 68% of Latino registered voters voted in support of Obama and only 23% voted in favor of Romney. By contrast, 49% of all registered voters support Obama, while 47% say they support Romney.

A poll conducted by Univision and ABC News in January, found that 27% of Latinos thought that the GOP is hostile to Latino voters. Many Latinos felt that the Republican Party’s handling of immigration has contributed to a rise in Latino pan-ethnic identity, isolating Latinos from other demographics in the country.

The Republican Party does have one vital tactic which might gain Latino votes, spearheaded by Florida Senator, Marco Rubio, the son of exiled Cuban citizens. Rubio is currently putting together the GOP equivalent to the Democrat sponsored Dream Act. He told the Associated Press last week,

“We have to come up with an immigration system that honors both our legacy as a nation of laws and also our legacy as a nation of immigrants.”

The GOP version of the bill would not grant illegal immigrants citizenship, but it would allow young immigrants to stay in the country to attend college or join the military.

Rubio’s plan, according to the AP,

“Would allow young illegal immigrants who came to the United States with their parents to apply for non-immigrant visas. They would be permitted to stay in the country to study or work, could obtain a driver’s license, but would not be able to vote. They later could apply for residency, but they would not have a special path to citizenship.”

This drive toward a softer edge on GOP immigration reform talk, however, in some ways counteracts the anti-immigration stance Republicans pushed early in the primary process.

And President Obama has not been quiet on the subject either. As the election draws closer, Obama has tried to portray Romney as hostile to Hispanics. Last week, the Obama re-election campaign launched Latinos for Obama described as, “The largest ever national effort to engage Hispanic voters through voter registration, volunteering and voter turnout efforts.”

We are sure to see a heightened battle over Latino votes as the election season moves toward a climax in the months to come. What remains to be seen, however, is whether or not Republican efforts to gain Latino support will offer any results.

The Independent Voter Network is dedicated to providing political analysis, unfiltered news, and rational commentary in an effort to elevate the level of our public discourse.


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  1. DeAnn Padelo I am a Fl resident and have followed his voting record. He has consistently voted with the 1% right down party lines. He is no different than the rest. He is Cuban and for the most part, if you are Cuban you are welcomed here in this country with open arms, as long as you are able to touch land. They send you back if they catch you in the water. So their experience is different than Mexicans who have been totally set up to be the permanent underclass in this country.
  2. Vicki Morse Statements like that is what keeps Americans divided. Marco Rubio is Hispanic or Latino and is a Republican. I'm a registered Dem and voted for him. I like what he stands for doing thing legally and doesn't promote division as most of political elite that occupy higher offices right now do.
  3. Independent Voters of America Rubio would certainly help Romney in FL and with Latinos and Independents across the country -- it remains to be seen if Romney is bold enough to pick him in the Veepstakes
  4. Thomasine Parrott I would not care if my mother was running as a fanatical right-winged Republican ... it is no way I could give them my vote. No respect for women, hisppanics, blacks, asians, indians, muslims, homosexuals, lesbians, indians, the diabled, the elderly, the poor, or the middle class. I'm going with the man fighting to bring the country back while preparing for our future. OBAMA 2012 ... I've Got His Back!
  5. Cheryl Wooten Spriggs The illegal ones?
  6. Bob Morris Can't see as it would make much difference
  7. Andrew Kurywczak robamney has not secured the nomination, so a little premature to be talking vp
  8. Richard Georgeou It was reported by Fox News that the Hispanic vote is only 9% of the total vote.No,Rubio may sway some Hispanic voters,but not enough to make a difference,IMO.
  9. Bill Jurkovich No. How much policy does the V.P. make? Nada!!
9 comments
DeAnn Padelo
DeAnn Padelo

I am a Fl resident and have followed his voting record. He has consistently voted with the 1% right down party lines. He is no different than the rest. He is Cuban and for the most part, if you are Cuban you are welcomed here in this country with open arms, as long as you are able to touch land. They send you back if they catch you in the water. So their experience is different than Mexicans who have been totally set up to be the permanent underclass in this country.

Vicki Morse
Vicki Morse

Statements like that is what keeps Americans divided. Marco Rubio is Hispanic or Latino and is a Republican. I'm a registered Dem and voted for him. I like what he stands for doing thing legally and doesn't promote division as most of political elite that occupy higher offices right now do.

Independent Voters of America
Independent Voters of America

Rubio would certainly help Romney in FL and with Latinos and Independents across the country -- it remains to be seen if Romney is bold enough to pick him in the Veepstakes

Thomasine Parrott
Thomasine Parrott

I would not care if my mother was running as a fanatical right-winged Republican ... it is no way I could give them my vote. No respect for women, hisppanics, blacks, asians, indians, muslims, homosexuals, lesbians, indians, the diabled, the elderly, the poor, or the middle class. I'm going with the man fighting to bring the country back while preparing for our future. OBAMA 2012 ... I've Got His Back!

Bob Morris
Bob Morris

Can't see as it would make much difference

Andrew Kurywczak
Andrew Kurywczak

robamney has not secured the nomination, so a little premature to be talking vp

Richard Georgeou
Richard Georgeou

It was reported by Fox News that the Hispanic vote is only 9% of the total vote.No,Rubio may sway some Hispanic voters,but not enough to make a difference,IMO.