Independent Congressional Candidate Chris Stockwell Says He Can Win in Mass.

In an already hotly contested race for the congressional seat in Massachusetts’ sixth district, an independent candidate has just thrown his hat into the ring.

Chris Stockwell, an avowed centrist and political outsider, has launched his campaign to run as an independent candidate for the coveted seat in Massachusetts. More than just a sideshow to the Democratic primary campaign and a strong Republican challenger, Stockwell firmly believes he will win:

“I want to be the first of many independents elected to the United States House of Representatives. Together, we need to show the 434 other districts around this great nation that it can be done. I intend to create that road map to show how it’s done.” – Chris Stockwell

That’s his goal.

The sixth district has been held by John Tierney since 1997. Tierney, a Democrat, is facing serious primary challenges from a former marine, Seth Moulton, and immigration attorney Marisa DeFranco. The primary winner will face a renewed bid by Republican Richard Tisei, who lost a close contest to Tierney in 2012.

“On November 4, when the networks report on the nation’s tightest race in the Massachusetts sixth, they will report that neither the Democrat nor the Republican won, but rather a credible independent with a strong message for change,”  Stockwell said.

Stockwell is counting on his appeal to the majority of voters in the district who are registered as “unenrolled,” along with moderates of both major parties. He claims these voters will agree that it is time to “shake things up in Washington” and back him as the only logical choice.

“Most people I talk to are amazed that there is not a single independent in the U.S. House,” Stockwell commented.

Most people I talk to are amazed that there is not a single independent in the U.S. House.
Chris Stockwell
The upcoming election, he says, is an opportunity “to chart a new course for the sixth district, and for America.”

He describes how the existing choices only serve to maintain the status quo and is no longer an acceptable path.

“Voting for either major party’s candidate will simply shuffle the same deck of cards, resulting in the same hand,” Stockwell remarked.

His experience as a long-time business leader, family and church devotee, and active community figure support his more recent political endeavors. The Stockwell name is well known in the area. His ancestors came to Massachusetts in 1672, and over the centuries were farmers, soldiers, laborers, professionals, business owners, and public servants in many communities.

Stockwell became politically active after the economic and political collapses that began in 2008.

In 2011, he launched the American Centrist website and maintains an active Twitter presence. He used these social media efforts to express and refine his philosophy and beliefs. His campaign website launched on July 1, 2014.

Stockwell suggests a litmus test for good governance: the willingness to collaborate and a clear bipartisan instinct. This is the path to problem solving, and he urges everyone — Democrats, Republicans and independents alike — to join his movement to “help America shine brightly once again.”

“Helping our nation find a new path forward is my passion,” he added.

Stockwell’s foray into political engagement led to his realization that America needs new leadership based on fresh ideas. He subsequently concluded that the best way to accomplish his goals was by entering the political arena directly.

Stockwell has created an extensive and well thought out platform addressing the economy, social issues, and international affairs. He believes in raising the federal minimum wage, working toward a path to citizenship for immigrants, combating racism, and addressing climate change through clean energy — including nuclear power.

He has sketched out an agenda for job creation and to reduce long-term debt by over $4 trillion in the next 10 years. Stockwell believes in “rightsizing” government by increasing funding to highly effective programs and reducing or removing funding to ineffective ones. He supports the Affordable Care Act and will strive to reduce health care costs and improve access.

Stockwell’s overriding theme is one of progress, and he refuses to accept the premise that the problems we face are too difficult to solve.

Additionally, he maintains that the root cause for the nation’s poor economic performance is political gridlock in DC.

“Remove the risk and uncertainty, and industry will invest in new markets, plants, equipment and jobs once again,” Stockwell said. “That’s what has been holding up full recovery.”

During his tenure, Stockwell hopes to inspire other like-minded individuals across the nation to follow his lead. According to him, “there are other courageous people out there who are willing to take on the major parties, and lots of patriotic moderates who will work for them and support them.”

Stockwell says he will also focus on motivating young people in America to become tomorrow’s leaders. He says that his work would be complete after 4 terms, and once that happens a new generation would take over.

But none of this can happen, he says, “without the strong support of the moderate middle majority.” He explained how the leaders of the major parties have the power, the money, and the attention to remain in power — with no real incentive to change the status quo.

Stockwell has amassed a team of close personal advisers who have urged him to move forward to achieve his vision. Thousands of others, he asserts, will join him to set the example “that powerful, selfish interests can indeed be handily defeated.”

He believes this new independent alliance in Congress — a “Center Coalition” — will be vital in solving the challenges that the nation faces.

Stockwell faces an uphill battle against established candidates and the resources of the major parties. Stockwell believes he has the message voters want to hear, but the lingering question remains whether or not there is enough to time to deliver this message to enough voters before November.