Chelene Nightingale: the forgotten gubernatorial candidate

Meg Whitman isn’t the only woman running for Governor.  Chelene Nightingale is also running for governor on the American Independent Party ticket, and she is proposing some novel solutions to help rescue California from the abyss.  At this time, the media and political pundits view her as an irrelevant candidate, but keep in mind, the media has obsessed over the typical, high-profile candidates for years, and the state has become the laughingstock of the Union.  Those looking to dig a bit deeper, evaluate alternative solutions, and think outside the box should take a closer look at Nightingale.  Here are some of her proposed solutions to various issues:

Education-

1.  Increase choice by utilizing vouchers.

2.  Hold teachers to higher performance standards.

3.  Create low cost nutritional options and school work programs for families in need.

4.  Offer state support to homeschooling families.

5.  Curtail educational benefits of illegal immigrants.

 

Economy-

1.  Institute a freeze on all state hiring, pensions, salaries, taxes, and borrowing.

2.  Establish specific spending limits.

3.  Cut state programs by 5% annually for the next 10 years.

4.  Institute a part-time legislature.

5.  Cut business taxes.

6.  Reduce workers’ comp costs and other extraneous benefits.

 

Environment-

1.  Address population growth by enforcing immigration laws.

2.  Explore privatizing the state’s water supply and infrastructure.

3.  Eliminate taxes and regulations on farmers.

 

Immigration-

1.  Secure the borders.

2.  Enforce current immigration laws.

3.  End all state benefits to illegal immigrants.

4.  Support the California Taxpayer Protection Act.

5.  Enact E-Verify statewide.

6.  Cut off state funding of sanctuary cities.

7.  End funding of in-state tuition for illegal immigrants.

 

States rights-

1.  Demand state sovereignty under the 10th amendment of the U.S. Constitution and challenge federal law that burdens California with unconstitutional legislation.

 

Even if one disagrees with some or all of Nightingale’s positions, as a registered candidate, she should be able to compete alongside the Republican and Democratic candidates for the 2010 gubernatorial bid.  California is in no position to hinder discourse or drown out alternative perspectives.  Big money, big stars, establishment picks, and media favorites have failed the state time and time again. It’s high time for fresh debate, new faces, and challenging dialogue.  

Let’s hope a free and open-minded media walks the walk and offers Nightingale the opportunity to fully participate in the political debate.