Taxation Without Representation

Yesterday, I wrote an article titled “America: Land of the Czar?” which presented my worries that America is indirectly handing over its representative government authority to unelected officials with superior power. Now, just today, the news from Washington D.C. is that the Senate has blocked the auto bailout package from going through.

The response from the treasury department: a blasphemous slap in the face to the American government, its constitution, and its people. Just in from the Associated Press:

The Treasury Department said Friday it’s prepared to act to avoid any possible collapse of nation’s three largest auto companies given that rescue efforts in Congress have failed.

“Because Congress failed to act, we will stand ready to prevent an imminent failure until Congress reconvenes and acts to address the long-term viability of the industry,” said Treasury spokeswoman Brookly McLaughlin.

Whether you are for or against this bailout is irrelevant. This is a major swipe at our system of checks and balances and should remind us all that next Tuesday is the 235th anniversary of that cold winter day when Sam Adams and John Hankock, among others, led what is now known as the Boston Tea Party, to protest taxes imposed on the colonies by the British without colonial representation.