Respect Would Go A Long Way to Improving Political Discourse in America

How do we fix the world’s problems? One word: Respect.

In some terms, this means respecting others through individuality — being a part of a group that is self-sustaining. For example, the out of work or the homeless working together to sustain cohabitation or partnership through economies of scale.

In other terms, this means reading the other person and not expecting them to ”read your mind” or react to you in kind. We are not all the same and yet we are not all that different when it really comes down to it.

Every day on the road I see people cutting eachother off, and yet when they get cut off they react emotionally and combatively. It is hypocrisy and the road is only one forum.

We see this in politics and we see it in our everyday lives. People fail to take accountability and responsibility for their actions — notably so in politics.

Politicians from one party blame the politicians from the opposing party for problems the government is currently facing. However, all they have to do is turn to their own party and be the “bigger person” and identify a compromise to take the reins.

It all fundamentally boils down to respecting one another. No one is perfect. And yet, everyone must rely on eachother, in some way, whether seen or unseen.

I posit that Respect is a lost art and is barely even a science at this point. This further permeates into false veneer customer service with representatives failing to even take a moment to answer the question, “How Are You?” — whether or not the person asking the question finds it relevant data.

Ultimately, getting angry or happy is not the key — the key is being respectful. In the end, we are all accountable, too.

Editor’s note: This article originally published on Poway Patch on Saturday, November 29, 2014, and has been edited for publication on IVN.

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