Tweet Chat: A Conversation on Drone Policy & Privacy #IVNchat

TweetChat_Drones Original photo courtesy of Shutterstock:
“3D UAV”/ Shutterstock.com[/caption]

Unmanned Aerial Vehicles (UAVs) and drone policy have recently taken center stage among privacy advocates, with the Federal Aviation Administration’s (FAA) involvement in domestic drone use causing a stir among those both for and against the commercial use of drones within our borders.

While the FAA test sites have the potential to create thousands of jobs in a market that could quickly reach $90 billion, the potential for abuse remains high, leading civil liberties groups to advocate for the additional monitoring of surveillance capabilities to better prepare for privacy concerns in the future.

Lawmakers have also taken action. California State Assemblyman Jeff Gorell (R-Camarillo) and Assemblyman Steven Bradford (D-Gardena) introduced a bill to put restrictions on how law enforcement agencies’ use drones.

“Our legislation clarifies how law enforcement and other public agencies will be allowed to use UAVs, and protects the public from unwarranted intrusions,” Gordell explained in a February press release.

In light of the recent attention on domestic drone policy, proposed legislation, and the outpour of privacy concerns, IVN is hosting a tweet chat on Thursday, May 9, at 5pm PT on “Drone Policy & Privacy,” with the intention of fostering a constructive conversation on the potential benefits and dangers of using drones for commercial use and how these concerns should shape policy.

What: Drone Policy & Privacy Tweet Chat

When: Thursday, 5-6pm PT, 8-9pm ET

Where: Tweetchat.com 

Hashtag: #IVNchat

To join the conversation, just sign in to TweetChat.com with your Twitter account at 5pm PST on Thursday, enter in the hashtag #IVNchat, and speak for yourself!

If you’re on Google+, you can RSVP here.

Any questions? Either tweet at us using the hashtag #IVNchat or ask below in the comments section.

Check out the latest IVN coverage on drones: 
Civil Rights Groups Urge FAA to Test Drone Surveillance Capacities
6 Arguments in Favor of the Commercial Use of Drones
Bill Would Ban Armed Drones and Protect Privacy
Drone Manufacturers Set Their Sights on Non-Military Surveillance 
Americans Believe Drone Strikes on Citizens Unconstitutional, Poll Finds