The Future of the Democratic Party: Top Ten Prospects for 2016

Credit: unhindered.com
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The first part of this story covered the up-and-coming Republicans who are likely to run in 2016, should Gov. Romney lose. This covers the Democrats.

If President Obama wins re-election, these 10 Democrats can hypothetically be the next Democratic presidential candidate. Some of these names may not currently carry national attention, but they are the future of the Democratic Party. Some have family ties (Clinton, Cuomo), close relationships with past presidents (Biden, Emanuel), while others made a name for themselves in Congress (Schumer) and as governors (Kaine, Warner).The Democratic National Convention is also a great place to see who else is out there and who’s next.

Below are the top 10 Democratic presidential prospects.

1. Joe Biden

As the current sitting vice president, Biden has the closest relationship to Obama. Biden will have the best opportunity of continuing Obama’s policies, almost as an “Obama third term.” Obama tapped Biden to head the Middle-Class Task Force to come up with solutions to help common Americans. Biden also led the Debt Commission with Congressional leaders to pass a deal. As one of the youngest senators in the history of Congress back in 1972, he has been in politics most of his life and ran for president twice before. Joe Biden is able to relate to the American people. One of his problems is that he doesn’t censor what he says as often as he sometimes should and makes comments such as the recent “Gonna put y’all back in chains” referring to Romney’s de-regulation of Wall Street. Also, Biden’s age comes into the question as he’ll be 74 come inauguration day.

2. Hilary Clinton

Secretary Clinton has the unique background from being the First Lady for 8 years and following that up with 8 years at being the Senator from New York to finally being nominated by Obama as Secretary of State. Her gender should not be seen as an impediment to her political career. Her name recognition goes beyond her political career, but as a candidate in 2008, she was Obama’s toughest opponent in the 2008 Democratic presidential primary. That primary, which went into June before Clinton withdrew, showed Clinton to be an excellent fundraiser and campaigner. The greatest drawback to her running in 2016 would be her age; she would be 69 years old in 2016. Regan was 69 when he won and there have only been 3 president’s who were 65 and older at their inauguration.

3. Chuck Schumer

The ambitious senator from New York has been a vocal defender for Obama in Congress, where his name recognition is most high. He is the number 3 Democrat in the Senate behind Harry Reid and Dick Durbin and Sen. Schumer is also Democratic Policy Committee, which focuses on party unity and creating a party platform. As chairman of the Democratic Senatorial Campaign Committee in 2006, he was instrumental in winning back the majority. However, he helped put together the 2008 bailout under Bush and Wall Street is one of his largest contributors. That will certainly come up if Chuck Schumer does run for president.

4. Tim Kaine

Tim Kaine is the former mayor of Richmond and governor of Virginia, a major swing state. The most obvious obstacle to Kaine’s future aspirations is his upcoming senatorial election against George Allen. Allen was a former governor, senator, and representative, which makes Kaine’s 2012 race one of the most watched in the cycle. Kaine was also chairman of the DNC and endorsed candidate Obama back in 2007 allowing him close ties to other prominent Democrats across the country. Politically, Gov. Kaine’s views are moderate, as he does come from a swing state.

5. Andrew Cuomo

Gov. Cuomo’s list of accomplishments are enough to receive votes from Democrats and Republicans alike. His bi-partisan form of governing New York saw the passage of the same-sex marriage bill, which also saw Cuomo reach national headlines. His earlier career as a lawyer saw him championing the rights of the poor and homeless in NYC and by the 90s he was in the Department of Housing and Urban Development under Clinton. On top of that, he has family connections on his side. He was married to a Kennedy and is the son of a former three term governor, Mario Cuomo.

6. Rahm Emanuel

Sending a dead fish in a box may seem an extreme reaction, but Rahm Emanuel earned a reputation of being a hard-edged politician. Back as an advisor to Bill Clinton in the 90s, Emanuel earned the nickname “Rahmbo.” In 2002 he entered the House of Representatives and by his second term, he chaired the Democratic Congressional Campaign Committee where he oversaw the House return to a Democratic majority the same way Schumer did for the Senate. After becoming Obama’s Chief of Staff for just under two years, he stepped down to successfully run for mayor of Chicago. Mayor Emanuel’s critics will point to his brief stint at Freddie Mac after Clinton appointed him as a director. Close ties to the real estate and investment market before it went bust may be a blemish, but Rahm’s skills in campaigning and fundraising shouldn’t be overlooked.

7. Mark Warner

Warner was a former governor of Virginia and the current senator. Prior to these roles, he was a venture capitalist and helped fund the wireless phone provider, Nextel in the early 90s, earning millions from the investment. Back when he was governor, he worked with both parties to restructure the tax code and increased tax returns by $1.5 billion, which he put towards education. After that term was over, he gave the keynote address at the 2008 DNC, following on Obama’s speech in 2004 that boosted his popularity on a national scale. In an interesting hypothetical May 2012 Public Policy Poll, Warner would beat current Virginia Governor, and possible Republican presidential candidate, Bob McDonnell in a 2014 Senate race and a 2016 Presidential run.

8. Martin O’Malley

Maryland Governor Martin O’Malley is 49 and served two terms as governor as well as two terms as mayor of Baltimore. He saw a decrease in the crime rate as mayor, increased taxes as governor to combat the deficit, fought for same-sex marriage equality, and public funding for illegal immigrants. The last two measures will be on the ballot in 2012, forming a coalition among supporters for both but also has strong opposition. Gov. O’Malley may have two more victories to claim by the time he finishes his second term as governor.

9. Evan Bayh

Like Cuomo, Evan Bayh has a famous politician for a father, Birch Bayh. Senator Birch Bayh oversaw two amendments to the Constitution and was a proponent of Title IX. Evan Bayh is a former two term senator and governor of a state that, before Obama, went Republican in presidential elections dating back to Nixon in 1968. The centrist Bayh favored smaller government and, as a fiscal conservative, lowered taxes and created a surplus for Indiana. However, during President Obama’s debates for health care reform, it became known that Sen. Bayh’s wife sat on the board of five major health insurance companies, earning millions. Chief among them were WellPoint, headquartered in Indiana and vocally opposed Obama’s health care overhaul.

10. Bill Richardson

With Spanish and Mexican heritage, Bill Richardson brings a unique background to the table. In the 1980s through the late 1990s Gov. Richardson was a representative for New Mexico. After that, Bill Clinton selected him as the Ambassador to the United Nations. Clinton followed that up by appointing Richardson as Secretary of Energy. He served at several think tanks and advisory firms before running for governor of New Mexico, which he won twice. During that time, he served as chairman of the Democratic Governors Association and ran unsuccessfully against Obama in the 2008 presidential primary. As an elder statesman, Richardson helped ease tensions between the US and North Korea when Pyongyang was developing nuclear fuel rods. His age is a concern as he will be approaching 70 in 2016, but he has the ability to serve other pivotal roles in government.

There are several other notable mentions. Those that have youth on their side have time to foster greater name recognition and develop their career further. Rep. Chris Van Hollen (D-Md.) has reached headlines as being vocal in his support of Obama’s budget and fiscal matters and Cory Booker, mayor of Newark, NJ is 43 and a Rhodes Scholar just like Bill Clinton. Deval Patrick, a former Assistant Attorney General under Bill Clinton, followed Mitt Romney as Massachusetts’s governor and finishes his second term in 2014. Even Rep. Debbie Wasserman Schultz (D-Fl.) deserves honorable mention as a prominent female leader in the House of Representatives and current DNC chairwoman.

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  1. Website Design Good answers in return of this question with solid arguments and describing the whole thing about that.
  2. Buddy Dallas I wonder what Hispanics think???? White and old Back in April, a Public Policy Poll made Clinton a huge favorite to win the Democratic Party's presidential nomination in 2016. But by then she'll be 70. Biden will turn 74 shortly after the 2016 election. Though the other Democrats who show up in the polls are younger, they are almost all white -- and not Hispanic. That's a real political blind spot for a party that needs a big turnout of Hispanics -- If Democrats want to be the party that looks like tomorrow, they have to realize the future starts now. For millions of Hispanic voters, it probably won't be enough for their loyalty to Obama to be rewarded in 2016 with just a convention title and prime-time speaker's slot. Julian Castro seems to have signaled as much when he told the National Journal that both parties hadn't done "a good enough job of outreach to the Latino community." For too long, the Democratic Party treated the presidential ambitions of blacks as an annoyance that had to be tolerated. It should not make the same mistake with Hispanics.
  3. Brandon Fallon By the way, what do you think of the 10 Republicans that went with the other half of this story?
  4. Brandon Fallon I would like to see more diversity in the primary race. Julian Castro and Antonio Villaraigosa would do well, but I see them going after the governorship of their respective states first. Castro said he was looking for re-election whereas Villaraigosa has plans to run for governor. They both had a prominent spot at the DNC, which always helps with presidential ambitions.
  5. Bob Tim Kaine. Montana Gov. Brian Schweitzer
  6. Kevin My #1 choice for pres 2016 is Hillary Clinton MY #2 choice for pres 2016 is Mark Warner My #3 choice for pres 2016 is Andrew Cuomo My #4 choice for pres 2016 is Martin O'Malley & MY #5 and final choice is Kirsten Gillibrand, but i hope Cuomo runs for pres so Kirsten can run for Gov.
  7. Tomas I'd prefer a Richardson-O'Malley ticket, as it stands now, but there is a lot of time between now and then.
  8. Luke Cadden That is the most racist and illogical comment on this page. No race "owns" a party. If you were not being a bigot you could have made a valid and mature point concering the decline in White America.
  9. theoccidentalobserver Democratic Party has a bright future. Its the party of highly organized Blacks, Hispanics, Jews and Asians. They fight to defend and advance their ethnic interests. Whites on the other hand do not have a party. GOP is owned by Chamber of Commerce which wages its own war on Whites by importing millions of cheap laborers. Whites are rapidly declining in power, resources and fertility, whereas non-Whites are rapidly increasing in fertility and political power. 100 years ago 35/100 people were White, today only 9/100 people worldwide are White, and in 100 years, whites will be extinct.
  10. Tomas Unfortunately, this acorn fell too far from the tree.
39 comments
Website Design
Website Design

Good answers in return of this question with solid arguments and describing the whole

thing about that.

Buddy Dallas
Buddy Dallas

I wonder what Hispanics think????

White and old

Back in April, a Public Policy Poll made Clinton a huge favorite to win the Democratic Party's presidential nomination in 2016. But by then she'll be 70. Biden will turn 74 shortly after the 2016 election. Though the other Democrats who show up in the polls are younger, they are almost all white -- and not Hispanic.

That's a real political blind spot for a party that needs a big turnout of Hispanics --

If Democrats want to be the party that looks like tomorrow, they have to realize the future starts now. For millions of Hispanic voters, it probably won't be enough for their loyalty to Obama to be rewarded in 2016 with just a convention title and prime-time speaker's slot.

Julian Castro seems to have signaled as much when he told the National Journal that both parties hadn't done "a good enough job of outreach to the Latino community."

For too long, the Democratic Party treated the presidential ambitions of blacks as an annoyance that had to be tolerated. It should not make the same mistake with Hispanics.

Bob
Bob

Tim Kaine. Montana Gov. Brian Schweitzer

Kevin
Kevin

My #1 choice for pres 2016 is Hillary Clinton

MY #2 choice for pres 2016 is Mark Warner

My #3 choice for pres 2016 is Andrew Cuomo

My #4 choice for pres 2016 is Martin O'Malley

& MY #5 and final choice is Kirsten Gillibrand, but i hope Cuomo runs for pres so Kirsten can run for Gov.

Tomas
Tomas

I'd prefer a Richardson-O'Malley ticket, as it stands now, but there is a lot of time between now and then.

Michael Snider
Michael Snider

I'd vote for Bill Richardson or maybe Andrew Cuomo if the GOP nominee's really scary, but not the others. I think Cuomo's probably going to be the nominee in 2016. Remember a governor of New York is always considered a contender for the presidency unless he (so far all NY governors have been men) really doesn't want it, e.g. Hugh Carey, George Pataki, probably a few others.

Sean Walker
Sean Walker

Not exactly a list to get excited about. This article should not have been written until after the DNC convention...

Paula Ralaford Davis
Paula Ralaford Davis

Of that group, Bayh, if his values are like his dads'. Birch was a good guy.

Charles Fregeau
Charles Fregeau

Barry will override the 22d amendment and become Maximum Leader for Life.

Mac Mizzle
Mac Mizzle

mmm Andrew Cuomo is the only one i would consider voting for on that list...otherwise i really wanna see Rand Paul or Rubio run in the future

Linda Gallie
Linda Gallie

Hillary Clinton/Elizabeth Warren in 2016! A powerhouse of a team!!

Richard Griffin
Richard Griffin

John Conley: Don't forget that Congress is complicit in most of those things you listed. Demublicans are not going to save us from anything.

Mace Gill
Mace Gill

I am disinclined to vote for EITHER of the 2 major parties now or ever. But looking at this list ... Joe Biden???? He's the Democrats version of Dan Quayle! Hillary Clinton???? I'd be sickened to vote for a Clinton OR a Bush! http://www.facebook.com/groups/260281364082802/

Ann Akard
Ann Akard

Not enough women listed there. We have let men run this country 200+ yrs.(and we all see where that has gotten us) I'm ready to turn it over to the women!

Jeff Smith
Jeff Smith

Obama just set the Democratic and minority agenda back 50 years with his affirmative action patheticnes.

Darlene Ruiz
Darlene Ruiz

With the exception of Hillary who I think is burned out and I wouldn't want her blowhard of a husband back in the White House, none of the other candidates appeal to me at all. There must be other strong women to consider.

Mark Schug
Mark Schug

Obama won't win so it doesn't matter......

Raynale Torris
Raynale Torris

As far as I am concerned BOTH parties need to go. The sooner the better; and to answer your question...I don't like any of the 2016 candidates any more than I like the 2012 candidates.

Robert Schmid
Robert Schmid

1. Biden. GAG

2. Hillary - I could IF her husband hadn't been president. (I have the same problem with W and Jeb)

6. Rahm Emmanuel - The Dick Cheney of the Democratic party. Oh HELLS no.

I haven't learned to hate the rest yet. Give me time.

Keith Pyron
Keith Pyron

dummycrats, republican'ts...same thing.

Mo Dennis
Mo Dennis

24 million unemployed, 40 million on food stamps...I don't think so.

John Conley
John Conley

Lets review Obama's Record:

1) Bush had over 60% Employed. Currently (July 2012) 58.4% are employed down from 60.6% in Jan 09'.

2) The Obama Stimulus Outsourced American Jobs and YOU paid for it !

3) Obama has more UNEMPLOYED Women than Bush did; about 3% more.

4) Economic Growth has slowed, again, to about 1.5% in the 2nd Quarter.

5) Obama has 56.5% MORE SPENDING than Bush did.

6) Obama has BORROWED 49

.7% MORE than Bush.

7) Obama EXCEEDS that of Bush in Welfare Recipients

SEE: http://www.facebook.com/note.php?saved&¬e_id=10151099883137528

http://data.bls.gov/timeseries/LNS12300000

http://www.bls.gov/news.release/empsit.t15.htm

Want more of this??

Juli Ida Hogan
Juli Ida Hogan

I would pick Hilary Clinton, with much confidence.

Brandon Fallon
Brandon Fallon

By the way, what do you think of the 10 Republicans that went with the other half of this story?

Brandon Fallon
Brandon Fallon

I would like to see more diversity in the primary race. Julian Castro and Antonio Villaraigosa would do well, but I see them going after the governorship of their respective states first. Castro said he was looking for re-election whereas Villaraigosa has plans to run for governor. They both had a prominent spot at the DNC, which always helps with presidential ambitions.

Tomas
Tomas

Unfortunately, this acorn fell too far from the tree.

Brandon Fallon
Brandon Fallon

Paul and Rubio were mentioned in the other article for the top 10 Republican prospects who may run for president in 2016. Granted, by 2016 everything may change and these names are just who may run for president in 2016, not who will win. The names and order is debatable.

Brandon Fallon
Brandon Fallon

Thank you for the numbers. Aside from unemployment, Obama's record on tacking the deficit is also debatable because the deficit has not been cut in his first four years. My other article is on the 10 Republicans who may run for president in 2016 if Romney doesn't win. Regarding who will win the party nomination is even more debatable because there are other prominent names in both parties. Although a lot can change in one term, I still wish the economy gets better.

theoccidentalobserver
theoccidentalobserver

Democratic Party has a bright future. Its the party of highly organized Blacks, Hispanics, Jews and Asians. They fight to defend and advance their ethnic interests.

Whites on the other hand do not have a party. GOP is owned by Chamber of Commerce which wages its own war on Whites by importing millions of cheap laborers.

Whites are rapidly declining in power, resources and fertility, whereas non-Whites are rapidly increasing in fertility and political power.

100 years ago 35/100 people were White, today only 9/100 people worldwide are White, and in 100 years, whites will be extinct.

Luke Cadden
Luke Cadden

That is the most racist and illogical comment on this page.

No race "owns" a party. If you were not being a bigot you could have made a valid and mature point concering the decline in White America.