Ron Paul movement donates 6 tons of food to charity

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Critics often claim that the libertarian worldview is nice in theory, but won’t really work in the real world.  This Christmas, Dr. Ron Paul’s army of libertarian-minded supporters put this criticism to the test.  Based on an official press release, grassroots volunteers collected over 12,000 pounds of food to donate to charity in thirty-six different cities.

theblaze.com

Danielle Davis, Ron Paul supporter and volunteer said:

…We would like to show people- as Ron Paul believes- that grassroots efforts of voluntary charity are a much more efficient and direct way to help those less fortunate than ourselves; government isn’t the only option.

Now, even if one disagrees with Ron Paul or the libertarian worldview in general, the results of the Christmas food drive speak for themselves. The libertarian philosophy can prove effective in the ‘real world’, and it can be a force for good.  If the Ron Paul movement seeks to provide further evidence to a skeptical public, then perhaps it would do well to organize more charity events as the presidential campaign season rolls on.

In fact, with two doctors, Dr. Ron Paul and his son, Dr. Rand Paul, serving as figureheads of the present-day, libertarian-minded movement, perhaps grassroots organizers would do well to consider organizing free health clinic events around the country.  Or, since Ron Paul receives more military donations than any other presidential candidate, charity events geared toward serving the nation’s active duty soldiers, veterans, and their families could be an especially meaningful option. These are just two ideas.

As recent poll numbers show, America is more seriously considering Ron Paul’s limited-government philosophy these days. At a time when the populace is rapidly losing patience with the empty talk of self-serving politicians, a populist movement willing to actually ‘walk the walk’ could serve as a powerful testimony. As they say, actions speak louder than words.

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  1. icons pack I apologise, but, in my opinion, you are not right. I am assured. Write to me in PM, we will talk.
  2. Mike Berger While it's agreed that something needs to change, it's easy to see that this might not be it. Many of the freshmen congresspeople are espowsing libertarian idesls(even if they aren't calling themselves libertarians) and all that's happened is more gridlock. And fights over stupid things like paying medical bills for 9/11 firstresponders..really? Should that ever be a question? No, we need to get big money out of politics..
  3. Zach Allen In an attempt be as unbiased as possible, I suggest any naysayer to study the history of our country and especially the words spoken by the ones who were actaully able to make changes to our country. Read the quote above. US politics of the past 20+ years, and all those who suuport(ed) it, are really in no place to say "nay" to any new idea that has any potential to make a positive impact. TRY SOMETHING. If you are curious about how libertarians would fare, vote in some libertarian seats into Congress, see what happens. If they fail, then the naysayers can continue saying what they will. If they do not, and perhaps add a mix of perspectives that could help the discussions of our government representatives make better, more constructive, decisions...then good. Mix it up & see what happens.....its the only way.
  4. Zach Allen In 1932, FDR said "It is common sense to take a method and try it. If it fails, admit it frankly and try another. But above all, try something."
  5. Zach Allen As illustrated by the current status of our political system, no political theory is perfect. The great thing about our country is our system's design to allow anything to be TRIED.
  6. Noel Akins Gregory, that is the problem with libertarianism, there is no Common good. The whole point of American Libertarianism is the protection of private property. Libertarians enter the social contract only as far as the establishment of law to protect their property from others, and to do with their property as they see fit, regardless to what harm it may cause others. It is sold now as it was then as ultimate personal freedom. If you had an American style Libertarian government, you would not have, under their philosophy/theory, anything held in common or as a public service. There would not be national/state/city owned parks. There would not be public schools, health departments, city services. There would not be public roads. You would just have police and courts and jails, and a military. The only thing they allow for as the purpose of government, in theory, is the protection of personal property. That's it. You add anything about common good to it, and the purpose for the philosophy becomes moot.
  7. Independent Voter Adam Francis Cornford your point would be much better taken without the inappropriate language...we try to keep moderation of comments to a minimum here and there is no need for the flagrance.
  8. Gregory Moohn It has some useful ideas to help us engage in the discourse of creativity on evolving a system, a social system that is different from what we have but yet, in many repsects it retains core values. I prefer a libertarianism that is infused with a healthy dose of communitarianism. A system where one can be in favor of all for one but yet at the same time in favor of a system beleiving in one for all. Now i know we have been told that to hold these two views simultaneously is impossible but I believe quite the contrary: that anything is possible!
  9. Noel Akins It is also based on a false premise that was really only valid in the context from which it evolved, namely the ownership of land by the king and the church.
  10. Noel Akins Libertarianism is the ultimate justification for "your on your own buddy, and get off my lawn before I call the cops."
15 comments
Mike Berger
Mike Berger

While it's agreed that something needs to change, it's easy to see that this might not be it. Many of the freshmen congresspeople are espowsing libertarian idesls(even if they aren't calling themselves libertarians) and all that's happened is more gridlock. And fights over stupid things like paying medical bills for 9/11 firstresponders..really? Should that ever be a question? No, we need to get big money out of politics..

Zach Allen
Zach Allen

In an attempt be as unbiased as possible, I suggest any naysayer to study the history of our country and especially the words spoken by the ones who were actaully able to make changes to our country. Read the quote above. US politics of the past 20+ years, and all those who suuport(ed) it, are really in no place to say "nay" to any new idea that has any potential to make a positive impact. TRY SOMETHING. If you are curious about how libertarians would fare, vote in some libertarian seats into Congress, see what happens. If they fail, then the naysayers can continue saying what they will. If they do not, and perhaps add a mix of perspectives that could help the discussions of our government representatives make better, more constructive, decisions...then good. Mix it up & see what happens.....its the only way.

Zach Allen
Zach Allen

In 1932, FDR said "It is common sense to take a method and try it. If it fails, admit it frankly and try another. But above all, try something."

Zach Allen
Zach Allen

As illustrated by the current status of our political system, no political theory is perfect. The great thing about our country is our system's design to allow anything to be TRIED.

Noel Akins
Noel Akins

Gregory, that is the problem with libertarianism, there is no Common good. The whole point of American Libertarianism is the protection of private property. Libertarians enter the social contract only as far as the establishment of law to protect their property from others, and to do with their property as they see fit, regardless to what harm it may cause others. It is sold now as it was then as ultimate personal freedom. If you had an American style Libertarian government, you would not have, under their philosophy/theory, anything held in common or as a public service. There would not be national/state/city owned parks. There would not be public schools, health departments, city services. There would not be public roads. You would just have police and courts and jails, and a military. The only thing they allow for as the purpose of government, in theory, is the protection of personal property. That's it. You add anything about common good to it, and the purpose for the philosophy becomes moot.

Independent Voter
Independent Voter

Adam Francis Cornford your point would be much better taken without the inappropriate language...we try to keep moderation of comments to a minimum here and there is no need for the flagrance.

Gregory Moohn
Gregory Moohn

It has some useful ideas to help us engage in the discourse of creativity on evolving a system, a social system that is different from what we have but yet, in many repsects it retains core values. I prefer a libertarianism that is infused with a healthy dose of communitarianism. A system where one can be in favor of all for one but yet at the same time in favor of a system beleiving in one for all. Now i know we have been told that to hold these two views simultaneously is impossible but I believe quite the contrary: that anything is possible!

Noel Akins
Noel Akins

It is also based on a false premise that was really only valid in the context from which it evolved, namely the ownership of land by the king and the church.

Noel Akins
Noel Akins

Libertarianism is the ultimate justification for "your on your own buddy, and get off my lawn before I call the cops."

Jill Greene
Jill Greene

@Chad, yes, because that worked so well during the Great Depression. Oh wait, kids starved and parents committed suicide. My bad.

Melissa Skanse Rodriguez
Melissa Skanse Rodriguez

The thing is, the Conservatives and the Liberals probably donated the same amount, if not more too. This really doesn't prove Libertarians are better.

Chad Bright
Chad Bright

@Trudy... You let individuals/charities/churches take care of those needs. You reduce taxes and government intervention and let communities handle their needs. It will definitely lower costs and corruption.

Trudy Olson
Trudy Olson

They gave food. How do they coordinate housing, medical care, and other needs. And how do they do it over the entire year, instead of just when feeling generous asst the holidays?

Ryan Bernier
Ryan Bernier

Libertarianism is the ultimate political philosophy. It is the embodiment of what America was founded on. It is also the fairest ideology because it recognizes the importance of the individual. It is also VERY misunderstood.